Notes from the Visible One

Fantastic Four

princelesscomic:

You know, I think Michael B. Jordan is an interesting and refreshing choice of casting for Johnny Storm.

However, I think it is regrettable that Fox didn’t have the guts to cast a woman of color in their leading female role, despite the character being the sister of Michael…

disabledpeoplearesexy:

cripple-fabulous:

heystaceykay:

 This image comes directly from a Nordstrom advertising campaign in the fall and winter of 2012. The model featured in the ad is Angela Rockwood, who also stars in a reality television series called Push Girls on the Sundance channel. As is mentioned on the show, Angela is a model and actress who was paralyzed from the neck down after a car accident.
 The picture promotes the idea of an equal relationship between the viewer and viewed. By including her wheelchair but not making it the focal point of the picture, this advertisement makes a powerful statement of inclusivity. It shows all of her without making any attempts to highlight nor erase her disability. The camera angle is not one that signifies hero worship akin to “supercrip” pictures but it is also not looking down upon her.  

I love this!

Really beautiful! I might have posted this picture before (or a similar one of her) but even if I did, the picture and the comment are good enough to post it again!

disabledpeoplearesexy:

cripple-fabulous:

heystaceykay:

This image comes directly from a Nordstrom advertising campaign in the fall and winter of 2012. The model featured in the ad is Angela Rockwood, who also stars in a reality television series called Push Girls on the Sundance channel. As is mentioned on the show, Angela is a model and actress who was paralyzed from the neck down after a car accident.

The picture promotes the idea of an equal relationship between the viewer and viewed. By including her wheelchair but not making it the focal point of the picture, this advertisement makes a powerful statement of inclusivity. It shows all of her without making any attempts to highlight nor erase her disability. The camera angle is not one that signifies hero worship akin to “supercrip” pictures but it is also not looking down upon her. 

I love this!


Really beautiful! I might have posted this picture before (or a similar one of her) but even if I did, the picture and the comment are good enough to post it again!

(via seananmcguire)

heysawbones:

crinklesnsmudges:

alimarko:

We Speak is a poster and blog campaign featuring ten young women who are speaking up about their relationships with mental health and how it informs their identities. Part of Launch: Stamps School of Art and Design’s Senior Thesis Exhibition at the University of Michigan, it will be featured at Work Gallery - Ann Arbor in the exhibition opening on Friday, April 18th from 6-9. The show will remain up through May 3rd. 

In the past year, the ten young women featured in the poster portion of We Speak came face to face with the state of our mental health. Our stories, carefully and honestly written, are meant to start a conversation about a topic that many of us wish we could ignore. But these are our realities, and in sharing them, we want to start chipping away at the stigma that often keeps us feeling weak and alone.

In addition to the original ten participants, everyone is encouraged to consider sharing their own story about mental health. By contributing your experiences, you can help open the discussion about the importance of mental health and tear down the stigma that keeps it so hidden. By sharing this project, you can foster support.

We Speak blog | More information | Submit your story | Mental health resources | By Alicia Kovalcheck

This is an amazing project. We must be brave to speak with our hearts.

Please talk about mental health with those you love. It is one of the most important things to talk about as a human.

I care about this.

(via seananmcguire)

beggars-opera:

One Time a Cat Peed on a 15th Century Manuscript While the Monks Weren’t Looking
"Some cats are friendly and others are more territorial, but regardless of differences in personality, all cats have one clear objective: to pee on the things you love. It has always been this way throughout history. For example, here is a page of a medieval manuscript that a cat peed on, making a real mess for one Monk scribe.
…On a more serious, scholarly note, isn’t it fascinating how the two different pages are written? On the left is very dense, flowing script that’s clearly put down very deliberately, and on the right is a lighter, more scribbled sideways note — like the scribe took his time with the former and hastily jotted down the latter to explain the behavior of his dumb cat. Assuming that the same scribe wrote both texts, of course, it’s an interesting juxtaposition.
Anyway, sorry about the art history nerdery. Let’s get back to cats peeing on stuff.
In case you can’t read medieval Latin very well, the transcription is as follows:

“Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”

Which roughly translates to:

Here is nothing missing, but a cat urinated on this during a certain night. Cursed be the pesty cat that urinated over this book during the night in Deventer and because of it many others [other cats] too. And beware well not to leave open books at night where cats can come.

So, as a bonus, if you’ve ever wanted to shout at your cat in Latin, that’s probably how you would do it.”

beggars-opera:

One Time a Cat Peed on a 15th Century Manuscript While the Monks Weren’t Looking

"Some cats are friendly and others are more territorial, but regardless of differences in personality, all cats have one clear objective: to pee on the things you love. It has always been this way throughout history. For example, here is a page of a medieval manuscript that a cat peed on, making a real mess for one Monk scribe.

…On a more serious, scholarly note, isn’t it fascinating how the two different pages are written? On the left is very dense, flowing script that’s clearly put down very deliberately, and on the right is a lighter, more scribbled sideways note — like the scribe took his time with the former and hastily jotted down the latter to explain the behavior of his dumb cat. Assuming that the same scribe wrote both texts, of course, it’s an interesting juxtaposition.

Anyway, sorry about the art history nerdery. Let’s get back to cats peeing on stuff.

In case you can’t read medieval Latin very well, the transcription is as follows:

“Hic non defectus est, sed cattus minxit desuper nocte quadam. Confundatur pessimus cattus qui minxit super librum istum in nocte Daventrie, et consimiliter omnes alii propter illum. Et cavendum valde ne permittantur libri aperti per noctem ubi cattie venire possunt.”

Which roughly translates to:

Here is nothing missing, but a cat urinated on this during a certain night. Cursed be the pesty cat that urinated over this book during the night in Deventer and because of it many others [other cats] too. And beware well not to leave open books at night where cats can come.

So, as a bonus, if you’ve ever wanted to shout at your cat in Latin, that’s probably how you would do it.”

(via brbshittoavenge)

Possibilities

medievalpoc:

Today on medievalpoc we brainstormed historically accurate Asian women as Robin Hood in Medieval England, with possible Trotula the Medieval gynecologist as a Merry Woman, touched on 30 ways to become An Immortal from a non-Western perspective (including eating mermaid meat!), revisited the accurately diverse demographics of the Caribbean and possibilities thereof (including LGBT pirates), saw some average peasants of color from the Renaissance doing their peasant thing, learned about the legendary beauty of an enslaved man named Paul in Pre-Revolutionary France, attempted to clarify the sociopolitical nuances of terminology, religion and race in 16th century Spain and Portugal, and called out Gilgamesh for being a raging tryhard.

^ In one day. Which is kinda the point here-and why I can be pretty critical of how we see the same things over and over and over in Medieval style fantasy media.

No writer or creator is limited by history or “historical accuracy”.

Anything you can possibly imagine has a historical precedent.

I find that prospect absolutely thrilling, and I hope you do, too.